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Learn and Remember

Learn and Remember

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$3.90

Quick Overview

This model demonstrates the difference between remembering things we’ve learned and the way we learned them. The model also distinguishes between short term periods of 3 weeks and longer periods of 3 months.


Related models: DMAICLEANDeming CircleDecision MakingKnowledge DefinitionKnowledge Value ChainKnowledge ConversionLearn and Remember;

$3.90

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Details

Learning and remembering

 

Origin

We are unaware of the origin of this model or these research results.  

Related models: DMAICLEANDeming CircleDecision MakingKnowledge DefinitionKnowledge Value ChainKnowledge ConversionLearn and Remember;

The model

This model demonstrates the difference between remembering things we’ve learned and the way we learned them. The model also distinguishes between short term periods of 3 weeks and longer periods of 3 months. The following methods of learning are called:  

      Explaining;

      Explaining and demonstrating;

      Explaining, demonstrating, and doing it ourselves.

Explaining

The classical method of learning. You sit at your desk and the teacher talks. All day long. It also happens at University when the professor ‘enthralls’ you with his stories. Research shows that after 3 months just 10 percent of information is retained. The criticism of students who cram for exams last minute is absolutely unjustified. If you start cramming and have your exams within three months you’ll still retain an average of 70%, which is good enough to pass.

Explaining and demonstrating

If you want teachings to ‘stick’, you can best do this by demonstrating how something is done during a ‘lesson’. Picture the first mechanic that replaces a battery in a car. The student stands and watches. In the short term this doesn’t have much impact. The impact is biggest during a period of 3 months, in which we remember roughly 35%.     

Explaining, demonstrating, and doing it ourselves.

The best thing to do is put your own hands on the dials. Take the battery. The student first has to find the battery, tries to disconnect it, gives himself an electric shock (and some explanation), and finally installs the new battery. He dreams about it that night and it slowly becomes part of his implicit knowledge (see the definition of knowledge). Three weeks later he can pretty much do all the steps himself. Three months later he can pass a test.

What can you do with it?

It’s obvious that the more you practice and repeat, the more you’ll master the knowledge. Every person also has his own preferred way of absorbing knowledge (listening, talking, writing, reading, doing, imagining etc.) The model shouldn’t be taken literally word for word. It just gives a general idea of the situation.   

Figure out the way you best learn certain kinds of knowledge. Be aware that simply telling someone a story doesn’t always have the desired effect. Make sure to provide your team with learning activities in which they do things themselves.

 

Good luck with all that remembering.

 

Related models: 

-   DMAIC

-   LEAN

-   Deming Circle

-   Decision Making

-   Knowledge Definition

-   Knowledge Value Chain

-   Knowledge Conversion

-   Learn and Remember;

 

 

Sources

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