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Project Management Radius

Project Management Radius

Availability: In stock

$5.20

Quick Overview

This model compares and tests the variables of time and hierarchical level against each other.We developed it in order to create an effective way to carry out evaluations, to support coaching and to formulate educational goals.


Related models: Time Management MatrixProjectmanager RadiusForce Field AnalysisSteering ParametersDevils TriangleSMARTBARTStakeholder Salience Model

$5.20

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Details

Project Management Radius

 

Origin

This model comes from the Models2use stables. We developed it in order to create an effective way to carry out evaluations, to support coaching and to formulate educational goals.   

Related models: Time Management MatrixProjectmanager RadiusForce Field AnalysisSteering ParametersDevils TriangleSMARTBARTStakeholder Salience Model

 

 

The model

This model compares and tests the variables of time and hierarchical level against each other.

Time:

  • Past: what happened, what went wrong, what can we learn;
  • Present: what still has to happen, where are we now, how do I steer the process;
  • Future: what is the final goal, what risks are there, what’s going to change?

 

Hierarchical level:

  • Low level: focus on team members;

  • Own level: focus on professional peers and hierarchical equals;

  • Higher level: focus on manager, stakeholders and investors.

The combination leads to a focus which will demand your attention. The focus on expectation on ‘future’ and ‘higher level’ will be primarily about vision and expectation management with regards to the stakeholders. The focus on the past in conjunction with the lower level could be about what went wrong in previous projects, in order to learn from them.     

The way you complete the 9 different focus areas is up to you.

 

What can you do with the model?

Every once in a while, it’s good to distance yourself from the thing you’re working on. Take a seat, grab this drawing and think of which circles light up. A lot of activity in a circle provides a bright color. This will help you to identify your ‘forgotten’ blind spots and to improve upon them.      

If you’re working on projects or programs, or any other kind of assignment, you’re a juggler who is trying to keep all the balls in the air at the same time.  On the one hand you’ve got to make sure the hens keep laying eggs (just so you know, they’re under you…) and on the other hand, you’ve got to make sure the rooster doesn’t start crowing (yes, yes, he’s above you…) And, just like with money, you can only spend your time once. You spend it on something that will provide you with the most value, relatively speaking. That’s how you can use this model: write down the activities that you’ll carry out in each focus area. Prioritize these activites in terms of importance. Reflect periodically as to whether you’re actually doing what you promised yourself you’d do.    

This model is very well suited to evaluation purposes. Give the 9 circles the three colors of a stoplight. Green is good, yellow is sufficient and red means there’s work to be done. Seeing it visually will create excellent dialogue with your employees.

Oh yes, the middle circle is about you J

Good luck increasing your radius! 

 

Related models: 

-   Time Management Matrix

-   Projectmanager Radius

-   Force Field Analysis

-   Steering Parameters

-   Devils Triangle

-   SMART

-   BART

-   Stakeholder Salience Model