Skip to Main Content »

 
 

BART

BART

Availability: In stock

$5.20

Quick Overview

The BART model is made up of the following aspects:



  •        Budget;

  •        Activities;

  •        Resources;

  •        Time.


The model’s premise is that by completing and guiding these various aspects, a successful introduction can be achieved. 


Related models: Time Management MatrixProjectmanager RadiusForce Field AnalysisSteering ParametersDevils TriangleSMARTBARTStakeholder Salience Model

$5.20

BART Cartoon

More Views

  • BART Cartoon
  • BART Page01
  • BART Page02
  • BART Page03

Details

BART

 

Origin

We are unaware of the inventor of this model.

Related models: Time Management MatrixProjectmanager RadiusForce Field AnalysisSteering ParametersDevils TriangleSMARTBARTStakeholder Salience Model

 

 

The model

The BART model is made up of the following aspects:

-      Budget;

-      Activities;

-      Resources;

-      Time.

 

The model’s premise is that by completing and guiding these various aspects, a successful introduction can be achieved.

 

Budget

All activities that are carried out need to be budgeted. The total cost of the activities needs to be transparent, declarable, and reliable. Costs must be continuously monitored in order to prevent under spending or exceeding of the budget. This pertains to all costs incurred during a project: direct costs such as man hours, indirect costs such as location management as well as out of pocket expenses for various expenditures, the hiring of expertise or the purchasing of products. The total amount of costs adds up to the overall project budget.       

Generally speaking, only costs and expenditures are considered part of a budget, as opposed to the income or profits. These last two, income and profits, are described extensively in a business case or other official document and are managed separately by an authorized business representative. The reason for this is that projects are often finished after the technical and organizational implementation. Value is added by generating income only after the implementation occurs. At that point, the project has already been dissolved. Before starting a project or programme, it is important that both costs and expenditures as well as income and profits are looked into collectively and are used to make decisions.   

 

Activities   

In order to reach the goals of a project, activities must be carried out. It is important to inventorize these activities as accurately as possible. If possible, a project should be divided up into partial projects, partial projects in main activities, and main activities in activities. The independence of certain activities needs to be mentioned.

 

Resources

The resources necessary for each activity need to be determined: people, materials, machines, spaces and so forth. All resources need to be expressed in Euros with the amounts being added up and checked against the original budget.      

 

Time

In the past, the project based work focused mainly on meeting deadlines. The activities executed on a project need to be split into clearly defined chunks, assigned a time and mapped out with regard to dependancies. The result of an activity always leads to a product or partial product. The scheduling needs to conform to the SMART rules. The progress of all activities needs to be continuously checked while carrying them out.

 

What can you do with it?

BART is a classification of the aspects that can add structure to the setting up of, and control of a plan.  

Activities are divided up depending on the approach used (agile, waterfall, reversed engineering etc.). Agile, for example, features very short cycles in which small chunks are completed. The waterfall method uses bigger chunks but runs the risk of projects being ‘under water’ for longer.

When defining the various activities, use different instruments. Consider, for example, the project break down structure. The project is divided into logical, mutually exclusive parts. An activity needs to be carried out for each part. The fixing of these activities can be used as input for the schedule.

When determining the resources, use Weggeman’s knowledge value chains. Use your own project plan as your mission, vision, goal, and strategy.  Determine what knowledge you’ll need to achieve this, what knowledge you already have and what you’ll need to hire externally. You can carry out analyses of your team by using the Belbin team roles test or Caluwé’s color test.  Any ‘gaps’ can be filled in, or reported as risks.

When making the schedule, use tools that support scheduling. Most organizations have a scheduling tool in which activities are shown in horizontal blocks. These work well because they demonstrate the connection between activities based on sequence. Some activities need to be finished before others can be started (first sand, then paint). Still other activities can be executed at the same time, in a parallel fashion (fixing a test plan and programming). As you can see, there are many possibilities. These tools can very effectively display a change in any scheduled activities.

Always use a critical path analysis. The critical path is the series of activities that determine the end date.  The delay of one of the activities without intervening, inevitably leads to the delay of the timeline. As a result, the critical path needs to be managed very carefully.

We wish you lots of ‘structured’ success in the future!

 

Related models: 

-   Time Management Matrix

-   Projectmanager Radius

-   Force Field Analysis

-   Steering Parameters

-   Devils Triangle

-   SMART

-   BART

-   Stakeholder Salience Model

 

 

 

Sources:

-       Wikipedia

-       www.managementmodellensite.nl

 

The product:

  • - Cartoon, full colour, 8000-6000 pixels
  • - Description, full colour, pdf