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Colour Theory of Change

Colour Theory of Change

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Quick Overview

The model describes five ways of thinking about change. A different colour is given to each way of thinking:



  •        Yellow print thinking

  •        Blue print thinking

  •        Red print thinking

  •        Green print thinking

  •        White print thinking


 


Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin



$5.20

Colour Theory of Change

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Details

The Colour Theory of Change (Colour Test)

 

Background

This model was developed by Léon de Caluwé (1950). De Caluwé is a professor in advisory skills at the Free University Amsterdam, business administrator and organisational consultant. He specialises in change management.

De Caluwé graduated back in 1975 in social psychology at the Utrecht University. In 1997 he took his doctoral degree from the Brabant Catholic University for his theses "Change must be learned. An evaluation study into the setup and effects of a large-scale cultural intervention by means of game simulation".

In the 1990s De Caluwé used to be an organisational consultant at Twijnstra & Gudde where today he is senior partner. In 2001 he became professor at the Free University Amsterdam. Together with Willem Mastenbroek he published the National Change Management Study.

Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin

 

The model

The model describes five ways of thinking about change. A different colour is given to each way of thinking:

-      Yellow print thinking: people will only change if the ‘what’s in it for me’ mentality is addressed. This approach lends itself to complex issues in which many parties (interested) are involved.

-      Blue print thinking: people will change if the goal is defined sharply and the way to it is crystal-clear. A project-based approach is a blue print way of changing. Provided the route is clear and the output (e.g. in a project) can be defined properly this option will be suitable.

-      Red print thinking: people will change provided they are rewarded or punished. Focus is on using HR instruments. Examples include payment, bonus structures, evaluation cycles and demotions or variable training budget depending on the achievements.

-      Green print thinking: people will change provided they are eager to learn and being stimulated, and provided the possibilities to learn are made available.

-      White print thinking: energy means change. Panta rhei: everything is moving. "You cannot enter the same river twice, because it is always fresh water streaming towards you." White thinkers consider complexity to be a positive thing instead of negative. This way of thinking focuses on facilitating change rather than actually steering change in a certain direction.

“Yellow” and “Blue” thinking means war! “Red”, “Green” and “White” thinking means peace!

 

How to use it

First of all you may do the colour test to decide on your convincing colour. This will help you assess whether you are made for a certain task including its context.

As an executive, project manager or department manager it will help you typify the people in your group. Mind you by this we do not mean pigeon-holing people. But rather, finding out if your team setup is in order or whether a person and a certain task/position seem to be a good match. 

The colour test may help you assess the situation and find the right person who is able to introduce the right interventions correctly. Not all issues can be tackled thematically. Not everyone is capable of proceeding thematically. Managers and the people in charge in particular must select the right approach.

The colour test may help you separate wish from reality. Having self-steering teams with dark-blue thinking managers does not sound like the perfect match.

 

Opting for a change approach focussing primarily on one of the colours, you may determine which instruments can be used effectively:

-      Yellow print thinking: remember the four pillars of van commitment to give substance to the question “What’s in it for me”. Sound stakeholder management and an extensive force field analysis are essential to this approach.

-      Blue print thinking: examples include choosing steering parameters such as the BOQIT+R. Compare objectives against the SMART measuring rod. All project management tools and instruments are perfectly suitable.

-      Red print thinking: a nice model here is that of Herzberg’s hygiene motivational factors. What should you offer people to keep them satisfied and what is required to motivate people.

-      Green print thinking: examples include Weggeman’s knowledge value chain and the related knowledge conversion model. It provides insight into which ways exist for learning and sharing knowledge.

-      White print thinking: examples include instruments such as PSTB (Problem Solving Teambuilding), providing structure without stemming the team’s creativeness.

Each colour has its own pitfall. Set against a risk analysis these pitfalls can be linked to selecting the right person/colour. Below table represents the features of each colour.

Good luck. We wish you colourful results

Related models: 

-   Big Five

 -   Core Quadrants van Ofman 

-   Whole Brain Model van Herrmann 

-   Color Theory of Change

 -   Cultural Dimensions (Hofstede) 

-   Leary's Rose

 -   Six Thinking Hats (De Bono)

 -   Social Styles (Wilson)

 -   Belbin

 

 

 

Sources:

       Wikipedia

       Leren veranderen, een handboek voor de veranderkundige, Léon de Caluwé, Hans Vermaak, EAN: 9789013016543

 

 

The product:

  • Cartoon, full colour, 8000-6000 px
  • Description, full colour, pdf