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Leary's Rose

Leary's Rose

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$6.50

Quick Overview

According to Leary’s Rose behaviour calls up behaviour: action and reaction, cause and effect, send and receive. Fifty years later Leary’s Rose is still a simple and effective model used to study human interaction (action-reaction).


Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin

$6.50

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Leary’s Rose  

 

Background

Timothy Leary used to be a psychologist and professor at Berkeley and Harvard, back in the 1960s. Leary’s Rose is a communication model that followed from a psychological study into the effect of human behaviour. According to Leary’s Rose behaviour calls up behaviour: action and reaction, cause and effect, send and receive.

Fifty years later Leary’s Rose is still a simple and effective model used to study human interaction (action-reaction).

Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin

 

The Model

In dealing with other people we have two basic needs:

-      We want to influence other people and their environment; and

-      We want to be accepted.

Do these needs sound familiar? You want people to hear what you have to say and you want them to use your information: it is effect you are after. And you want to be accepted, to feel that you are quite somebody. Well, the coordinate system of Leary’s Rose is based on these basic needs:

The vertical line indicates the level of influence. At the top you have lots of influence, below you have hardly any influence or none at all. The horizontal line shows the level of acceptance: the ‘together’ side means lots of acceptance. The ‘opposed side’ means little acceptance.

That is how you end up with four different behaviours:

-      Above behaviour: focussed on exerting lots of influence

-      Below behaviour: hardly focussed on exerting influence if at all

-      Together behaviour: focussed on acceptance

-      Opposed behaviour: focused on interests other than acceptance.

 

It is about behaviour, about how people act. It is not about what people are, there is a big difference. Even though some people may display some behaviour often, it does not mean they are that behaviour. Your identity, that is what you are, it is something you cannot change. Your behaviour, that is what you do, and that is something you can change.

 

How to use it

What is important is this: if you do not like someone’s behaviour, then you will need to change. It requires a quite different way of thinking, because we tend to blame each other.

You can be right or wrong, but that does not get you anywhere. It does not help, it is not effective. In fact: it will feed whatever you dislike.

So it makes much more sense to find out what does pay off.

      If you want the other person to show leading behaviour, then you yourself must be the follower. Example: if you want the other person to come up with ideas or solve his own problems, then you must keep silent about your ideas just as long until the other person comes up with his own solution.

      If you want the other person to be a follower more often, then you yourself will need to take charge. If for instance you always follow your colleague, try taking more initiative for instance by saying: “I’d like to have lunch with you. Let’s have some sushi this time.” Let’s see what that will bring you.

      If you are fed up with the other person’s offensive behaviour, perhaps you should stop defending yourself. What would your colleague do if you would simply smile and say: “Now where can we conjure up some adhesive tape?” Perhaps he will struggle a bit longer, but he is bound to give up soon!

      If you want the other person to stop defending himself all the time, make sure you do not attack him. Bet your colleague will soon stop grumbling if you would ask “What’s going on, is there something I can do to help?”

Sometimes you need to keep going, because the other person will not always give in soon. But remember: it seems like I haven’t changed my behaviour clearly enough, because the other person’s behaviour is still the same. So try again, or be clearer.

Related models: 

-   Big Five

 -   Core Quadrants van Ofman 

-   Whole Brain Model van Herrmann 

-   Color Theory of Change

 -   Cultural Dimensions (Hofstede) 

-   Leary's Rose

 -   Six Thinking Hats (De Bono)

 -   Social Styles (Wilson)

 -   Belbin

 

Sources:

-      Van Dijk, B., Influence others, start with yourself. About behaviour and Leary’s Rose, Thema 2008.

The product

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