Skip to Main Content »

 
 

Six Thinking Hats

Six Thinking Hats

Availability: In stock

$6.50

Quick Overview

The model/method follows from the idea that people usually have one way of thinking or approach for solving problems. Each problem is tackled in the same way. Using the thinking hats means you need to analyse the problem from different perspectives. Each thinking hat has its own colour presenting one way of thinking. The colour of the hat determines the perspective from which you will tackle the problem.


Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin



$6.50

Six Thinking Hats Cartoon

More Views

  • Six Thinking Hats Cartoon
  • Six Thinking Hats Page01
  • Six Thinking Hats Page02
  • Six Thinking Hats Page03

Details

 

Six Thinking Hats

Background

This method was developed by Edward de Bono (Malta, 1933). De Bono is a British psychologist, doctor and a widely read author of management books. He studied at Oxford and eventually gave lectures at Oxford, Cambridge, London and Harvard. De Bono also introduced the ‘lateral thinking’ (which led to the first profitable Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1984) and the ‘Six Thinking Hats’ concept.

Related models: Big FiveCore Quadrants van Ofman Whole Brain Model van Herrmann Color Theory of ChangeCultural Dimensions (Hofstede) Leary's RoseSix Thinking Hats (De Bono)Social Styles (Wilson)Belbin

 

The model

The model/method follows from the idea that people usually have one way of thinking or approach for solving problems. Each problem is tackled in the same way. Using the thinking hats means you need to analyse the problem from different perspectives. Each thinking hat has its own colour presenting one way of thinking. The colour of the hat determines the perspective from which you will tackle the problem.

 

Six thinking hats exist:                            

-      White thinking hat: ‘virginally’ white thinking, based on facts and objective details.

-      Red hat: ‘red mist’ before your eyes. Reacting emotionally and intuitively without having to account for anything.

-      Black thinking hat: playing the ‘devil’s advocate’. You have a negative and pessimistic approach to everything. ‘This will never work’. Everything is a threat.

-      Yellow thinking hat: the ‘sun’s hat’. You have a positive approach to everything. Nothing but sunshine. You focus on opportunities.

-      Green thinking hat: the ‘fertility’ hat. Try to make use of what is being said. Be creative. Dream and share your dreams.

-      Blue thinking hat: the ‘control’ hat. You distance yourself and try to control the process. Thinking, linking and monitoring the process is important for blue hat thinkers.

The blue hat plays the chairman’s role.

 

How to use it

Using the ‘Six Thinking Hats’ has several benefits:

-      Lift up team creativeness

-      Focus on one perspective

-      Understand other people better

-      Personal growth

-      Express yourself without risks.

 

Creativity

Using the ‘Six Thinking Hats’ is a good way of tapping team creativity. Putting on a certain hat (of course a real hat would be fun!) will make you analyse the issue from a certain perspective. Pessimists need positive thinking. Optimists need realistic thinking. Dreamers must look at the facts while analysts must have dreams. This will provide some very interesting results.

 

Focus

Focussing together with the group on one perspective means you will proceed purposefully without having all kinds of edge discussions.

 

Understanding the others

Another plus point is that people will value other people’s opinions and arguments properly. Using the hats allows people to understand each other better. Each individual has one or several predominant perspectives which determine his way of thinking. Consciously analysing each perspective will make you adopt the other person’s way of thinking.

 

Personal growth

The thinking hats enforce a certain way of thinking. Each individual has a predominant preference for tackling a problem in one or several ways (colour thinking). Giving someone a ‘badly fitting’ hat on purpose will help him improve and develop this way of thinking. The controller with the yellow hat, the bookkeeper with the red hat, the changer with the black hat, the quality manager with the green hat and the designer with the white hat will undoubtedly reach remarkable outcomes with a major learning effect.

 

Express yourself without risks

During the process each participant will play a ‘role’. The process forces participants to think from a certain perspective. This creates room for ventilating opinions which, without the thinking hats, would remain unshared, for instance because of the hierarchical relationships or due to the participants’ positions.

 

The usage

The hats can be used in different ways. You can opt for a plenary approach with the entire group wearing the same thinking hat at the same time. At a certain stage only positive matters will be discussed. The stirring effect on each other’s ideas might lead to surprising outcomes. In this way all hats are addressed one after the other.

Alternatively you may divide the hats over different people at the same time, creating a nice field of tension because of the different perspectives. The blue thinking hat is the process manager and must make sure people stick to their roles. During this process hats may circulate. Or you can leave participants to decide on which hat they want to put on. The process manager makes sure all colours are addressed.

The thinking hats can also be used according to the stage of the process. When analysing a problem the white, yellow and red hats are perfect for defining the problem crystal-clearly. To pass judgment on ideas the red hat is the best choice. When analysing opportunities and threats, for instance during a SWOT analysis, go for the yellow and black hats. The blue hat organises the process.

Good luck. We wish you a good-tempered team.

Related models: 

-   Big Five

 -   Core Quadrants van Ofman 

-   Whole Brain Model van Herrmann 

-   Color Theory of Change

 -   Cultural Dimensions (Hofstede) 

-   Leary's Rose

 -   Six Thinking Hats (De Bono)

 -   Social Styles (Wilson)

 -   Belbin

 

 

Sources:

-       Wikipedia

-       Edward De Bono. Six Thinking Hats (1985) ISBN 0-316-17831-4

 

 

The product:

  • Cartoon, full colour, 8000-6000 px
  • Description, full colour, pdf