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Will Skill Matrix

Will Skill Matrix

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Quick Overview

The matrix can be used for assessing the competence and willingness to perform a certain task. Based on this assessment one may decide on how to guide an employee effectively towards successful results.


Related Models: Grief CyclePeople and MotivationCircle of InfluenceWillingness to ChangeCore QuadrantsComfort ZonePeople and Competences;MaslovWill Skill Matrix

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The Will-Skill Matrix

Background

 

The Will-Skill matrix was introduced by Max Landsberg in his book The Tao of Coaching. Ever since this handy tool has been used at a large scale to make sure the coach’s interaction style is tuned to the coachee’s willingness to take on a certain task. Although it is more suitable for managers, it may also be used by internal and external coaches without the line management responsibility for the coachee.

Coaching takes place whenever a certain situation, problem or task presents itself whereby the coachee needs help. The Will-Skill matrix requires that a coach assesses the coachee’s skills for handling a situation, problem or task and for assessing the coachee’s willingness to take on a task.

 

Related Models: Grief CyclePeople and MotivationCircle of InfluenceWillingness to ChangeCore QuadrantsComfort ZonePeople and Competences;MaslovWill Skill Matrix

 

 

The model

The matrix can be used for assessing the competence and willingness to perform a certain task. Based on this assessment one may decide on how to guide an employee effectively towards successful results.

Employees are hardly ever in one quadrant all the time. Employees will be classified in one quadrant depending on the task and the employee’s:

-      Skill: Experience with the task, educational background, knowledge and natural talents, competences.

-      Will: The extent to which an employee is motivated, incentives for performing the task involved, safety at work, trusting the possibilities of and feelings about the task ("attitude").

Contrasting willingness and skill we will end up with the famous Will-Skill matrix. Motivation and competences present significant ingredients in managing people. Skill makes sure people can commit to the organisation; willingness makes sure they want to do so.

 

How to use it

Now, which leadership style is the most effective style for which type of employee? The key of the situational leadership model is that the executive will study how an employee can be guided most effectively. With effective leadership, the leadership style is determined according to the situation at hand, depending on the extent to which an employee is up to a certain task. Each employee has his own approach and the employee’s situation evolves.

The outlines are simple: an experienced employee (skill) does not need task-focused steering, a motivated employee (will) does not explicitly require relational, people-oriented guidance.

According to Hersey and Blanchard the Training/Guiding style is effective provided the employee has a few skills and is highly involved. Instructing is the best option for staff with very few skills and who are hardly involved. Stimulating will pay off with staff with average to high competences but who are not always equally involved, while delegating is the most efficient alternative for professionals who are competent and involved at the same time.

We wish you lots of skills and willingness. Hard on the content and soft on the relationship is the right credo.

 

Related models:

 

The Hersey-Blanchard Situational Leadership Theory is a leadership theory introduced by Paul Hersey, the professor who wrote the famous book Situational Leader, and Ken Blanchard, author of The One Minute Manager, while working on the first edition of Management of Organizational Behavior. The theory was introduced for the first time as the "Life Cycle Theory of Leadership". In the mid-1970s it was renamed Situational Leadership theory.

The basic foundation of Situational Leadership is that there is no such thing as the ‘best’ leadership style. Effective leadership is task-relevant, and most successful leaders are those who are capable of tuning their leadership style to the maturity of the individual or group they are trying to lead/influence. Effective leadership varies, depending not only on the person or group to be influenced, but also on the intended task or position.

 

The Quinn model links extraversion (focus on the outside world) and openness to new developments (focus on new things). Hersey, through situational leadership, emphasises the features altruism (focus on the other person, people-oriented) and conscientiousness (focus on result, task-oriented). The Wilson model combines task/people-orientation with assertiveness/cooperativeness (sub-feature of altruism). The overview includes the influential and conflict styles (Thomas-Kilmann). Wilson for instance has made a similar classification distinguishing the assertiveness level and the people- or task-orientation. Four styles can be derived from this: Analyst, Booster, Friendly and Expressive.

A quite different classification is the Deal and Kennedy classification (see also de Caluwé et al., 2002). Based on the risk level and the speed of feedback to actions Deal distinguishes four leadership styles.

 

Related Models: 

-   Grief Cycle

-   People and Motivation

-   Circle of Influence

-   Willingness to Change

-   Core Quadrants

-   Comfort Zone

-   People and Competences;

-   Maslov

-   Will Skill Matrix

 

 

Sources:

-       Hersey, P. and Blanchard, K. H. (1969). Management of Organizational Behavior – Utilizing Human Resources. New Jersey/Prentice Hall.

-       Hersey, P. and Blanchard, K. H. (1969). Life cycle theory of leadership. Training and Development Journal, 23 (5), 26–34.

-       Insert Hersey, P. and Blanchard, K. H. (1977). Management of Organizational Behavior 3rd Edition– Utilizing Human Resources. New Jersey/Prentice Hall.

-       Hersey, P. and Blanchard, K. H. (1977). Management of Organizational Behavior 3rd Edition– Utilizing Human Resources. New Jersey/Prentice Hall.

-       http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hersey-Blanchard_situational_theory

-       Landsberg, Max. (1996). The Tao of Coaching: Boost Your Effectiveness at Work by Inspiring and Developing Those Around You.

 

 

 

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