Skip to Main Content »

 
 

Circle of Influence

Circle of Influence

Availability: In stock

$5.20

Quick Overview

Lots of things happen every day. We experience them and respond in our own way. Part of the reaction (the response) to an incident (the stimulus) is unconscious: we are, to a large extent, conditioned (by our genes, our own childhood and education, as well as our surroundings both professionally and personally)


Related Models: Grief CyclePeople and MotivationCircle of InfluenceWillingness to ChangeCore QuadrantsComfort ZonePeople and Competences;MaslovWill Skill Matrix

$5.20

Circle of Influence Cartoon

More Views

  • Circle of Influence Cartoon

Details

Circle of Influence

 

Origin

In 1989 Steven Covey wrote his book, “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People”. The book describes three habits necessary to grow from a “dependent” person to an “independent” person or employee.

In the first habit, “Being proactive”, Covey describes the circle of influence and the circle of involvement.  

After that, Covey writes about the three habits necessary to grow from an “IN-dependent” person to a “CO-dependent” person or employee. In the 7th habit, Covey describes what is needed in order to continuously use the first 6 habits. The book is based on four basic human qualities: imagination (the ability to create, conscience (values as well as the means to discover what makes you unique), free will (every person is free to choose in every situation), and self-consciousness.

Related Models: Grief CyclePeople and MotivationCircle of InfluenceWillingness to ChangeCore QuadrantsComfort ZonePeople and Competences;MaslovWill Skill Matrix

 

 

The model

Lots of things happen every day. We experience them and respond in our own way. Part of the reaction (the response) to an incident (the stimulus) is unconscious: we are, to a large extent, conditioned (by our genes, our own childhood and education, as well as our surroundings both professionally and personally). Personal leadership increases when one realizes that between response and stimulus, every person has a free choice. Everyone has his or her own personal responsibility as to responding to stimulus. Proactive people realize they have the ability to choose an answer/reaction (response). The double “i”: use your ingenuity (ability to imagine) and take initiative. Feel freedom and autonomy, trust your own conscience, and take action instead of waiting or taking the role of victim and letting others determine your destiny. Pay attention to your choice of language: “that’s just the way it is”, “it can’t be done”, or “I have to..” are the words of a reactive person. These statements usually lead to a self-fulfilling prophecy. Proactive people focus on the issues within the circle of influence. Reactive people, on the other hand, focus particularly on the circle of involvement: the weaknesses of others, the problems around them. This focus generates lots of negative energy and frustration which often leads to neglecting even the things within their direct sphere of influence. This, in turn, results in a factual decrease in their circle of influence!

The problems we face are:

      Problems that influence our own behavior (directly influenceable);

      Problems that influence the behavior of others (indirectly influenceable);

      Problems we can do nothing about, such as our past and certain aspects around us (no influence).

Covey says that all the aforementioned problems can be solved within our circle of influence and – ‘solved’ personal victories are (personal moments of growth). A main element in the circle of influence is the ability to make promises (setting goals) with oneself and keeping them, as well as to (dare) to communicate them.

 

What can you do with it?

You can become more aware of your productivity by looking at the things you spend the most time and energy on. Distinguish between the things you are involved with and the ones you have a direct influence on.

Covey challenges the user to a 30 day test by using this model:

      Listen to your own use of language and that of others. Analyze it and determine what is proactive and what is reactive;

      Imagine something you’ll be experiencing in the short term that normally had you responding reactively. How could you do this proactively? Practice your freedom to choose.

      Choose a problem at work or in your personal life. Determine whether you have direct, indirect, or no influence. Decide and take the first step towards solving the problem.

This is a good model to use with teams in order to create a discussion of ingrained behavior and attitudes, so that personal responsibility can be strengthened. It also helps to collectively learn the desired use of language. This can improve the output of a single individual or the whole team. 

We wish you lots of involvement and influence!

Related Models: 

-   Grief Cycle

-   People and Motivation

-   Circle of Influence

-   Willingness to Change

-   Core Quadrants

-   Comfort Zone

-   People and Competences;

-   Maslov

-   Will Skill Matrix

 

 

Sources:

       Wikipedia

       The seven habits of effective leadership,  Stephen R. Covey, (EAN: 9789047054641)