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Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI)

Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI)

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$6.50

Quick Overview

The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI) is used to determine how individuals respond in conflict situations. The model was developed by Kenneth W Thomas and Ralph H. Kilmann. It is the world’s most popular model when conflict management is involved.


Related models: Seven HabitsPhases of Team DevelopmentSituational LeadershipProfessional AttitudeConflict Mode ModelPrinciples of Leadership;Manager vs. LeaderCultural TypesLeadership and Influence

$6.50

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Details

Conflict Mode Instrument

 

Origins

 

The Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI) is used to determine how individuals respond in conflict situations. The model was developed by Kenneth W Thomas and Ralph H. Kilmann. It is the world’s most popular model when conflict management is involved.

Related models: Seven HabitsPhases of Team DevelopmentSituational LeadershipProfessional AttitudeConflict Mode ModelPrinciples of Leadership;Manager vs. LeaderCultural TypesLeadership and Influence

 

The model

The world’s most popular model in this field is the conflict mode instrument by Kenneth W. Thomas and Ralph H. Kilmann, better known as the Thomas-Kilmann model.

 

The TKI is based on an internationally acknowledged and frequently used conflict solving model:

-     This model describes how someone will probably behave in a conflict based on two dimensions:

       -    Assertiveness: the wish to force your (own) goals and reach your targets.

       -    Willingness/Cooperativeness: the wish to maintain a good relationship and ensure a smooth process.

-     The position on both dimensions can help determine the conflict management style of each individual. Also, the model explains how and when the five conflict management styles can best be used.

-     Usually there is a difference between the preferred style and the most effective style for approaching conflicts. This insight helps individuals and teams create more negotiating space and consciously consider alternative ways for reaching their shared goal.

 

Thomas & Kilmann have put this field of tension in an axes model characterising five different ways of handling conflicting interests:

-      Force (assertive / uncooperative)

-      Avoid (not assertive / uncooperative)

-      Work together (assertive / cooperative)

-      Give in (not assertive / cooperative)

-      Compromise (a little bit of everything)

 

Force (“My way or the highway”)

Top left is the shark: this person will go straight for his target without scruples. Reaching his targets is what matters most. What it does to you and whether the relationship is maintained in a healthy way is irrelevant. You’re either in or out.

 

Avoid (“I will think about it tomorrow”)

Bottom left is the turtle. Conflict risk? Head inside and do not interfere. The turtle is not really focussing on results, or the relationship. The good thing about this type of people is the distance they manage to keep in conflicts. This usually helps them study the conflict more objectively.

 

Work together (“Two heads are better than one”)

Top right is the wise owl. The owl overlooks the interests of each and every individual, including his. The owl wants to reach his goal and maintain a good relationship at the same time. He is perfectly capable of finding the right balance. He is always intensively and seriously trying to represent these interests and make them explicit.

 

Give in (“It would be my pleasure”)

Bottom right is the teddy. As long as the relationship is saved even if this could mean letting go of one’s targets. The teddy is a nice person, he is everybody’s friend and usually a good listener with a great empathy. Deadlines? I don’t think so!

 

Compromise (“Let’s make a deal”)

At the centre of the model is the fox (often represented as jellyfish with no backbone). The fox is the calculating negotiator. He is prepared to sacrifice something provided he gets something in return. His strategy is to reach the centre.

 

How to use it?

The Thomas-Kilmann instrument will help you decide on how you prefer to handle conflicts. It also makes clear how the five different conflict management styles interfere with the outcome of a conflict situation, in terms of relationship and result.

With this simple model you can gain insight into conflicts, analyse your personal influential style(s) and strengthen your negotiating position. Using the right style in the right situation will ensure more effective personal action in conflict situations.

After completing the test you will find out which style you prefer for solving conflicts. Nevertheless, we do not recommend using this preferred style whatever the situation may be. You must learn the different styles in a flexible manner.

Which style is required when, depends on the situation at hand. Are you responsible for tight deadlines, confident and not (strongly) dependent on other people, then forcing is your best option. If you are dependent on other parties who also have many interests, then working together would be the only choice. If the other person is more powerful (see the stakeholder salience model) and are his choices rather painless, then perhaps avoiding is your alternative. To gain trust and fetch in a big fish then giving in can be a very good strategy.

We wish you a conflict-free existence.

 

Related models: 

-   Seven Habits

-   Phases of Team Development

-   Situational Leadership

-   Professional Attitude

-   Conflict Mode Model

-   Principles of Leadership;

-   Manager vs. Leader

-   Cultural Types

-   Leadership and Influence

 

 

Sources

-     Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kilmann_Conflict_Mode_Instrument

-     http://123management.nl/