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Manager versus Leader

Manager versus Leader

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Quick Overview

This is not a management model. But that does not mean it is less fun. This here is one of the discussions that have raged for years. Is it important? Doesn’t matter really. We believe at least there are differences. This chapter also includes part of a research conducted by Paul Bridle.


Related models: Seven HabitsPhases of Team DevelopmentSituational LeadershipProfessional AttitudeConflict Mode ModelPrinciples of Leadership;Manager vs. LeaderCultural TypesLeadership and Influence

$5.20

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Manager versus Leader

 

Background

This is not a management model. But that does not mean it is less fun. This here is one of the discussions that have raged for years. Is it important? Doesn’t matter really. We believe at least there are differences. This chapter also includes part of a research conducted by Paul Bridle.

Related models: Seven HabitsPhases of Team DevelopmentSituational LeadershipProfessional AttitudeConflict Mode ModelPrinciples of Leadership;Manager vs. LeaderCultural TypesLeadership and Influence

 

The model

The discussion ‘Am I a manager or leader’ or ‘the difference between manager versus leader’ has existed for many years. Below is an unravelling of what has been written. Let us start with the definitions.

Manager

First a few definitions of ‘management’:

Management literally means to ‘control’ something. The English word is derived from the old French term ménagement "the art of directing, leading" and the Latin manu agere "lead by the hand". Manus is Latin for hand.

So, a manager ‘leads’ people by the hand. Now isn’t that what a leader does?

The French mine director Henri Fayol (1841 -1925) states that a manager has 6 tasks: predict, plan, organise, manage, coordinate and verify. Fayol is one of the founders of the management theories.

This proposition is getting closer to keeping what we have.

A manager is someone who is busy saddling people with work. In English the joke man-ager is used: a person who makes sure other people age fast. 

This does not sound like an inspiring person but rather like someone extracting energy from you.

 

Leader

For the leader we only use one definition.

A leader is someone who has leadership and is thus able to make people change.

Here we read: changing the existing situation rather than managing the current situation.

 

The British Paul Bridle studied when people are wiling to follow a ‘leader’, defining five criteria:

-    Passionate vision: the leader knows which way he is heading. The journey to the intended destination does not really matter. Problems become challenges. Creativity is used to tackle obstacles. The leader shows his passion to the environment to encourage other people to walk through fire on his behalf.

-    Consistent values and standards: practice what you preach. The leader believes in something, and communicates this. The leader is consistent. By doing thins consistently and continuously the leader creates a sense of integrity among his ‘followers’.

-    Loving people: a leader truly believes people matter. And that people should do the job. A leader is also capable of listening carefully to people. This is why he is usually considered to be a strong communicator. He plays the ball, not the man. In other words: he may emphatically disagree with you, but will appreciate you as a person.

-    Learning: the leader is eager to learn a lot and likes the people in his environment to do the same. He places his finger on the sore spot by not addressing you pedantically but rather by leaving you with that particular question … after which you will spend the night thinking about it. A leader makes sure to use your strengths and is less interested in your weaknesses.

-    Serious delegation: a leader will adjust his style to the situation at hand. He will intervene with the target in mind. If he feels intervention is sufficient, he will give responsibility back at once. The leader seriously delegates matters.

 

These five criteria are referred to as the hygiene factors; which means that in order to be recognised as a leader, you must consistently show these five criteria for a longer period of time.

Paul Bridle’s criteria confirm that managers and leaders indeed are different. The question is whether managers are no leaders not by definition or whether by definition they are no leaders?

 

The leader leads people. The manager leads things.

Below is an overview of the differences between managers and leaders:

Aspect

Leader

Manager

Will

Change

Stability

Leads

People

Things

Has

Followers

Staff

Execution

Creates

Implements

Drives on

Vision

Objectives/KPIs

Steers towards

Direction

Details

Frame of mind

Long-term

Short-term

Decisions

Facilitate

Take

Strength

Motivates

Monitors

Follows

Heart/feeling

Ratio

Uses

Cigar box

Spreadsheet

Focus on

Targets

Result

Risks

Take

Limit

Conflicts

Use

Avoid

Follows

New roads

Existing roads

Truth

Search

Determine

Does

Good things

Things well

Looks

Outside

Inside

Typology

Improvises

Standardises

Sits

Anywhere

In his room

Derives certainty from

Feeling

Analysing facts

Receives feedback

Through others

Through the database

Time

Make

Have

Influences

People

Numbers

Communicates by

Listening

Informing

 

  

How to use it

 

If you wish to be a true leader, at least bear in mind the five criteria which by definition you need to work out. Have a look around and decide instinctively who you feel is a leader. Analyse this person using Bridle’s 5 hygiene factors. It is interesting to see if his theory indeed makes sense.

Use the above differences between manager and leader during evaluations or appraisals. The question as to what a person is, what he aspires to be and what he thinks he is can be supported with these features.

Rest assured that besides good managers, bad leaders also exist. Nevertheless … is a ‘bad’ leader a leader? After all, it is up to the followers to decide whether you are a leader. And nobody will follow a bad leader. So we can assume instinctively that bad leaders do not exist.

Bad managers do exist though. But then they will still be real managers ….

Good luck on managing your leadership!

 

Related models: 

-   Seven Habits

-   Phases of Team Development

-   Situational Leadership

-   Professional Attitude

-   Conflict Mode Model

-   Principles of Leadership;

-   Manager vs. Leader

-   Cultural Types

-   Leadership and Influence

 

 

Sources:

-       Wikipedia

 

The product:

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- Description, full colour, pdf